Jews build a home in Samaria. (Matanya Tausig/Flash 90) Matanya Tausig/Flash 90
Jews build a home in Samaria

Interior Minister Ayelet Shaked tweeted that a planning committee would convene next week to approve 4,000 homes, calling construction a “basic, required and obvious” right.

By United with Israel Staff and Associated Press

Israel is set to advance plans for the construction of 4,000 new homes in Judea and Samaria, the interior minister said Friday.

If approved, it would be the biggest advancement of settlement plans since the Biden administration took office.

Interior Minister Ayelet Shaked, a staunch supporter of Jewish communities in Judea and Samaria, tweeted that a planning committee would convene next week to approve 4,000 homes, calling construction a “basic, required and obvious thing.”

Nabil Abu Rdeneh, spokesman for Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, said the planned approvals would have “serious consequences on the ground.” Abbas’ government continues to slip in popularity, with Palestinian support for the Hamas terror group growing.

Rdeneh did not say what those “consequences” might be, and the Palestinian Authority has no way of halting Jews from building communities in sovereign Israeli territory.

The Israeli media reported that the Civil Administration, a military body, would meet Thursday to advance 1,452 units, and that another 2,536 units would be approved by Defense Minister Benny Gantz.

In Washington, State Department spokeswoman Jalina Porter told reporters that the Biden administration has been clear that it “strongly oppose the expansion” of Jewish communities in Judea and Samaria. The region has been home to the Jewish people for thousands of years.

Israel gained control of Judea and Samaria from Jordan after the Jewish state was attacked in the 1967 Six-Day War. Israel has built more than 130 towns across the territory that are home to nearly 500,000 Jewish Israelis.

The Palestinians want all of Judea and Samaria to form their future state.

Construction of Jewish towns in Judea and Samaria can only be approved after a long bureaucratic process, and it was unclear how soon construction crews would be able to break ground on the 4,000 homes if they get a green light.