Illustrative. (Miriam Alster/Flash90) (Miriam Alster/Flash90)
Arab computer

The online game, called “The Race to Law,” went live on Sunday, as part of a plan to teach children the principles of democracy and how the Knesset works.

Israel’s parliament, the Knesset, has launched an interactive game for children in Arabic that promotes democratic values.

The Jerusalem Post reported on Monday that the internet game, called “The Race to Law,” went live on Sunday, as part of a plan to teach children the principles of democracy and how the Knesset works.

“The game simulates the work of the Knesset enabling all children, a boy or girl, to experience a simulation close to reality of the Knesset’s legislative work,” Knesset Speaker Yuli Edelstein told the Post.

“I’m happy that the game is now in Arabic, for the benefit of youth in the Arab sector that we did not reach before.”

The game enables the player to choose a bill and take it through the legislative motions. The player needs to give a speech in the Knesset to promote the bill and convince other Members of Knesset (MK). The site is geared for children aged 9 to 14.

The Knesset hopes that “The Race to Law” game will generate great interest among Arab youth, just as the Hebrew version did when it was launched in October. Since then, the site has received more than 60,000 hits, with the average browsing time exceeding five minutes, which is considered high, the Post reports.

By: United with Israel Staff

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