Yehuda Glick (2L) and Muhammad Jaber at the latter's home in Hebron. (Facebook) (Facebook)
Yehuda Glick and Muhammad Jaber

A resident of the PA who believes in dialogue with the Israelis was arrested for hosting an Israeli Knesset member who also advocates coexistence.

A Palestinian man was arrested for hosting Temple Mount activist Yehuda Glick at his home during the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha earlier this month.

Glick, executive director of the Haliba movement for Jewish freedom on the Temple Mount, promotes equal rights for people of all faiths at the holy site in the Old City of Jerusalem.

Muhammad Sabir Jabir, a resident of Hebron who believes in promoting dialogue, was detained for hosting Glick, sources in the Palestinian Authority (PA) told Ma’an News Agency, although the specifics of the charges are unclear.

Ma’an also reported that members of Jabir’s extended family announced on Facebook and through posters pasted throughout their neighborhood that they had “disassociated” themselves from their relative because he hosted Glick, who advocates coexistence.

On September 3, Glick posted photos on his own Facebook page showing him celebrating the Muslim holiday with Jabir in Hebron. “God-willing, we will all live here in peace,” Glick wrote. Many comments on the post in Arabic were vile, slamming Glick and Jabir with coarse language and hate.

Hebron is known as a hotbed of Palestinian terrorism.

In October 2014, Glick was shot and critically wounded by a Palestinian terrorist after delivering a lecture at the Menachem Begin Heritage Center in Jerusalem promoting equal rights at the Temple Mount.

Glick has never advocated disallowing Muslims, Christians and others the freedom to pray at the Temple Mount, Islam’s third-holiest site and the holiest site in Judaism, where the First and Second Temples stood. On the contrary; he often quotes from the verse in Isaiah, which states: “For My house shall be called a house of prayer for all nations.”

Most recently, Glick and lawmaker Shuli Moalem-Refaeli were the first Jewish parliamentarians in nearly two years to visit the Temple Mount, a week after Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu had decided to conduct a one-day “trial.” Jewish Knesset members were banned from the site since October, 2015 in an attempt by the prime minister to prevent a new wave of Palestinian terror from escalating into a full-blown intifada.

By: Terri Nir, United with Israel