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Facebook Israel with the red Price Tag graffiti. (21.7K קראו)

Operation Price Tag against Facebook Israel was carried out by Rotem Gaz, aka “Mark Zuckerberg Israel,” in view of the widespread wave of Palestinian incitement taking place on Facebook.

By: JNI.Media

Gaz sprayed red graffiti and attached sticky labels reading “Blood on your hands” on some of the walls of 22 Rothschild Tower in Tel Aviv, where the offices of Facebook in Israel reside. Facebook Israel CEO Adi Soffer Teeni last March rented four whole floors in the prestigious building, according to Mizbala.com.

Rotem Gaz is well known in the corridors of the global Facebook management, after, back in December 2011, he changed his name legally to Mark Zuckerberg, as part of a campaign designed to undermine Facebook’s lawsuit against him for allegedly peddling “likes” and other services at variance with the juggernaut social network regulations. The threat of a publicity blowout for the Zuckerberg V. Zuckerberg court case worked, and Facebook dropped the lawsuit.

Now Gaz is back with yet another campaign against his favorite social network, in view of the widespread wave of incitement taking place on Facebook, with Arab terrorists calling for the murder of Israelis and Jews. In recent weeks a wave of terror has taken over the social network, with hundreds of thousands of pages of incitement to harm Israeli citizens and Jews worldwide—unimpeded by Facebook’s clear standards that forbid such presentations.

It appears that the social network representative in Israel is choosing to ignore the incitement violators and disclaims any responsibility for such displays. Last Thursday Mizbala.com published a recording made by Israel Hayom reporters and other media organizations in Israel, who turned to Facebook’s PR staff as well as to the CEO herself, and were dismissed, their questions were ignored, and at one point they were hung up on.

Despite repeated reports by hundreds of thousands of Israelis, demanding the removal of pages promoting hate and violence, Facebook in most cases allows this content to remain online unmolested, and sometimes removes arbitrarily and without explanation content by Israeli users who try to fight incitement.

A case in point: Liat Alon, a popular Facebook user, like many Israelis received death threats during the first week in October, 2015. A Chat note sent to Alon by a Hamas operator said (Numerous Hebrew mistakes corrected): “Today I will be in your home and your family will burn. Palestine is our land and we have the right to live here or we’ll burn here. We’ve waited for this hour, and it is time already to meet and send you to Hell.”

The response status from Alon read: “The men of today are so aggressive.” The status earned 5,000 likes and hundreds of shares, and then something weird happened, reflecting what happens when Facebook uses robots to monitor its pages: Alon’s truly funny message was removed by Facebook, because it did not meet the social network’s community standards, and her page was blocked for 24 hours—while the perpetrator who openly threatened her life, part of hundreds of thousands of profiles, real and fake, continues to operate freely.

Gaz issued a message saying: “As long as Facebook maintains its refusal to remove pages that incite to the murder of Israelis and Jews, the blood of the victims will be in its head and the heads of its managers. This post was sprayed on the wall of Facebook’s Tel Aviv offices by the Israeli Mark Zuckerberg and its meaning is clear: stop the aid and the stage you provide inciters and maybe it will help to reduce the flames, Keep refusing to remove the pages of hatred, and the victims’ blood will be on your head.”